Home > Ottoman Secularism > The Abolishment of Millet System in Ottoman Empire

The Abolishment of Millet System in Ottoman Empire

The Rescript of the Rose Chamber was the first major reform in the Tanzimat reforms under the government of sultan Abdulmecid and a crucial event in the movement towards secularization. It guaranteed the life and property for all subjects, including non-Muslims. This put an end to the kul system, which allowed the ruler’s servants to be executed or have their property confiscated at his desire. The reforms eliminated the millet system in the Ottoman Empire giving rise to Ottoman nationalism. The millet system created religiously based communities that operated autonomously, so people were organized into societies.

The Rescript of the Rose Chamber also represented a move towards Westernization. It mirrored the liberal ideals of the French Revolution, which glorified humanity and individual rights. The Rescript was imagined as the savior of the Ottoman Empire by imposing modernizing and nationalizing forces. This move towards western ideals was also an effort to keep Europe out of the Ottoman Empire. By conforming to their standards, the Ottoman Empire hoped to appease Europe enough to keep them out of Ottoman affairs and avoid European control.

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  1. May 7, 2012 at 4:06 PM

    very well written, very informative…

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