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Quaid e Azam and name “The Grey Wolf”

Ataturk was named “Grey Wolf” for his bravery and for being a military genius.
Quaid e Azam M.A. Jinnah once bought a book that had information of  Ataturk and his revolution. Jinnah was very inspired by Ataturk. He gradually started seeing Ataturk’s refection in him. For the fact that Muhammad Ali  Jinnah thought of himself as “Ataturk of India (before independence)”. He used to talk to his family and friends about Ataturk. People who were close to him started knowing that Jinnah was inspired by Ataturk. Jinnah’s daughter named him “Grey Wolf” (which is the name given to Ataturk) because she knew that Jinnah was very inspired by Ataturk.
The name “Grey wolf” was given to Ataturk and Jinnah’s daughter Deena named Jinnah “Grey wolf” because Jinnah mostly used to talk about Ataturk.

Quaid e Azam M.A. Jinnah and M.K. Ataturk

May 22, 2012 2 comments

Fall of Ottoman Empire, the rise of nationalist movement, the Turkish revolution and Mustafa Kemal Ataturk and then his reforms.

Pakistani people have known this all for decades. Not only the Pakistanis but the founders of Pakistan were very interested in Turkish revolution. Quaid e Azam is, many times, thought to be a conservative in in Islamic thoughts was amazingly very inspired by the Turkish nationalist and reformist, Mustafa Kemal Pasha Ataturk.

While Mustafa was changing Turkey from a backward country to a civilized and leading country, Quaid e Azam Muhammad Ali Jinnah (the founder of Pakistan) was keenly observing him.

Now a days people propagate a false idea that Jinnah had nothing to do with Mustafa Kemal and that Jinnah was not inspired by Kemal. To a learnt person, these allegations do not mean anything. Jinnah was inspired by Mustafa Kemal Ataturk. He wanted to make Pakistan a very well established and civilized state just like Ataturk made Turkey.

In November 1932, Jinnah read H. C. Armstrong’s biography of Kemal Ataturk, Grey Wolf, and seemed to have found his own reflection in the story of Turkey’s great modernist leader. It was all he talked about for a while at home, even to Dina, who consequently nicknamed him ‘Grey Wolf’. Being only thirteen, her way of cajolingly pestering him to take her to High Road to see Punch and Judywas, “Come on, Grey Wolf, take me to a pantomime; after all, I am on my holidays.” (Wolpert)

This shows how much Jinnah was inspired by Ataturk. There is one more example that I would like to mention here.

Immediately after his death, Quaid-i-Azam, as President of AIML, issued a directive on 11 November 1938 to all the branches of the Muslim League in the whole of Indo-Pak subcontinent to observe Friday, 18 November as “Kemal Day”.

In this connection following directive was issued:
I request provincial, District and Primary Muslim Leagues all over India to observe Friday the 16th of November as Kemal Day and hold public meetings to express deepest feeling of sorrow and sympathy of Musalmans of India in the irreparable loss that the Turkish Nation has suffered in the passing away of one of the greatest sons of Islam and a world figure and the saviour and maker of Modern Turkey Kemal Ataturk“.

During a press interview Quaid-i-Azam Jinnah thus praised the services of Mustafa Kemal:
He was the greatest Muslaman in the modern Islamic World and I am sure that the entire Musalman world will deeply mourn his passing away. It is impossible to express adequately in a press interview one’s appreciation of his remarkable and varied services, as the builder and the maker of Modern Turkey and an example to the rest of the world, especially to the Musalman States in the Far East. The remarkable way in which he rescued  and built up his people against all odds, has no parallel in the history of the world. He must have derived the greatest sense of satisfaction that he fully accomplished his mission during his life-time and left his people and his country consolidated, united and a powerful nation. In him, not only the Musalmans but the whole world have lost one of the greatest men that ever lived“.

Allama Iqbal and Modern Turkish Independence

Turkey was the first country to engage his attention on account of its shifting fortunes. In the eyes of the Muslims of the subcontinent the Ottoman Caliphate was the guardian of Muslim faith and tradition and the symbol of Muslim pride and unity. The western nations, however, frantically conspired to oust the Turk, whom they scornfully called the sickman of Europe, from that continent. Turkey was involved in the Tripoli and Balkan wars in 1911. The end of World War I successively saw the dismemberment of the Turkish empire, a heroic and victorious war of liberation by the Turks, the establishment of the republic of Turkey and the abolition of the Caliphate. Iqbal wrote many poems throughout this period highlighting the desperate courage and heroism of the Turkish nation. Of these Khizr-i-Rah and Tulu-i-lslam are the monumental examples. These are imbued with robust optimism and rising’ hopes.

When Turkey overcame its political crisis, Allama continued to pursue new developments in that country with his characteristic concern. He supported the new constitutional developments in that country in his lecture on “The Principle of Movement in the structure of Islam” and justified the Turkish concept of Ijtihad in regard to the institution of Khilafat. Again, fully agreeing with the Turkish national poet Zia on an international ideal of Islam he says :

“For the present every Muslim nation must sink into her own deeper self, temporarily focus her vision on herself alone until all are strong and powerful to form a living family of republics.”

While concluding his discussion on the subject of re-evaluation of intellectual inheritance and reconstruction of religious thought, Allama again pays homage to modern Turkey in the following words:

“The truth is that amongst the Muslim nations of today, Turkey alone has shaken off its dogmatic slumber, and attained to self-consciousness. She alone has claimed her right of intellectual freedom. She alone has passed from the ideal to the real, a transition which entails a keen intellectual and moral struggle. They (Muslims countries) are mechanically repeating old values, whereas the Turk is on the way to creating new values. He has passed through great experiences which have revealed his deeper self to him. In him life has begun to move, change and ‘amplify, giving birth to new desires, bringing new difficulties and suggesting new interpretations.”